A discussion on the making of lewis carrolls alice in wonderland

Literature[ edit ] From a young age, Dodgson wrote poetry and short stories, contributing heavily to the family magazine Mischmasch and later sending them to various magazines, enjoying moderate success. Between andhis work appeared in the national publications The Comic Times and The Train, as well as smaller magazines such as the Whitby Gazette and the Oxford Critic. Most of this output was humorous, sometimes satirical, but his standards and ambitions were exacting. La Guida di Bragia.

A discussion on the making of lewis carrolls alice in wonderland

In chapter 1, "Down the Rabbit-Hole", in the midst of shrinking, Alice waxes philosophic concerning what final size she will end up as, perhaps "going out altogether, like a candle"; this pondering reflects the concept of a limit.

In chapter 2, "The Pool of Tears", Alice tries to perform multiplication but produces some odd results: I shall never get to twenty at that rate! Continuing this sequence, going up three bases each time, the result will continue to be less than 20 in the corresponding base notation.

Also in chapter 7, Alice ponders what it means when the changing of seats around the circular table places them back at the beginning.

This is an observation of addition on the ring of integers modulo N. The Cheshire cat fades until it disappears entirely, leaving only its wide grin, suspended in the air, leading Alice to marvel and note that she has seen a cat without a grin, but never a grin without a cat.

Deep abstraction of concepts, such as non-Euclidean geometry, abstract algebra, and the beginnings of mathematical logic, was taking over mathematics at the time Dodgson was writing. Literary scholar Melanie Bayley asserted in the magazine New Scientist that Dodgson wrote Alice in Wonderland in its final form as a scathing satire on new modern mathematics that were emerging in the midth century.

For example, in the second chapter Alice posits that the mouse may be French. She therefore chooses to speak the first sentence of her French lesson-book to it: In the eighth chapter, three cards are painting the roses on a rose tree red, because they had accidentally planted a white-rose tree that The Queen of Hearts hates.

Red roses symbolised the English House of Lancasterwhile white roses were the symbol for their rival House of York. This scene is an allusion to the Wars of the Roses. After the riddle "Why is a raven like a writing-desk?

The manuscript was illustrated by Dodgson himself who added 37 illustrations—printed in a facsimile edition in The book was reprinted and published in Other significant illustrators include: At the release of Through the Looking-Glass, the first Alice tale gained in popularity and by the end of the 19th century Sir Walter Besant wrote that Alice in Wonderland "was a book of that extremely rare kind which will belong to all the generations to come until the language becomes obsolete".

The first print run of 2, was held back because Tenniel objected to the print quality. The entire print run sold out quickly. Alice was a publishing sensation, beloved by children and adults alike. Among its first avid readers were Queen Victoria [36] and the young Oscar Wilde.

The book is commonly referred to by the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland, which has been popularised by the numerous stage, film and television adaptations of the story produced over the years. This list needs additional citations for verification.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. First UK edition the second printing.

About analysing the ‘Alice’ books

First US edition the first printing of above. Dodgson meets another Alice during his time in London, Alice Raikes, and talks with her about her reflection in a mirror, leading to another book, Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found Therewhich sells even better.

Cover of the edition First Japanese edition of an Alice in Wonderland novel. Despite being the first Japanese version of an Alice in Wonderland novel, it is actually a translation of Through the Looking-Glass.

Burt Company, aimed at young readers.The ‘Alice’ books have always been a favourite subject for analysis, as the story lends itself to various interpretations.

On the following pages you can find deeper analyses of the origins of the texts and illustrations, characters, and ‘hidden meanings’ in the Alice books.

The influence of Lewis Carroll’s life on his work. The following text is a shortening of: The Influence of Lewis Carroll’s Life on His Work”, by Brady – (source of this article) This text is reproduced on this site with permission from the author. 5. Traditionally, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass are considered stories for children.

Lewis Carrol - Carrol's Writing Style (Alice in Wonderland) Showing of 10

What do you think? 6.

A discussion on the making of lewis carrolls alice in wonderland

Since their publication, some readers have found material in Carroll’s book unsuitable for children. Are parts of the Alice books unfit for or harmful to children today?

7. Along with feminism, Carroll portrays another theme within "The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland": the Marxist Theory. Karl Marx worked with theories involving the social classes, and how they act, are educated, and how that has an effect on a people.

May 11,  · Lewis Carrol discussion. Carrol's Writing Style (Alice in Wonderland) Comments (showing of 10) (10 new) There are a lot of random things in the books that I just find funny somehow, like the Gryphon making that "Hjckrrh" sound at .

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ ˈ l ʌ t w ɪ dʒ ˈ d ɒ dʒ s ən /; 27 January – 14 January ), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer of world-famous children's fiction, notably Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the iridis-photo-restoration.com: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, 27 January , Daresbury, Cheshire, England.

A discussion on the making of lewis carrolls alice in wonderland
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